LHF in the News

Retired NFL players team up to lose weight

Pictured Above:  Former NFL player,
Cal Snowden walks near the William
H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center in Rock Creek Park 

Photo Credit: Matt McClain/The Washington Post

October 21, 2014 - Washington Post

Cal Snowden knows exactly how he got fat: No activity, and high calorie intake.

But the 67-year-olds tale has a back story, star ting in the 10th grade, when he joined the Roosevelt High School football team. The native Washingtonian had a knack for the sport, and he kept on playing at Indiana University. His pre-med plans fell apart when he attempted to tackle organic chemistry. So instead of medical school, Snowden wound up going to the NFL.

Vicky Hallett is a MisFits columnist and the Fit editor for Express. View Archive
At 225 pounds, the 6-foot-3 rookie was a smallish defensive end. I struggled to maintain even that, Snowden says, but his coaches insisted he get heavier. A beer-and-carb diet did the trick. By the time he retired in 1973 (after playing five seasons for St. Louis, Buffalo and San Diego), Snowden tipped the scales at more than 250 pounds.

These days, hes aiming for that same target only from the opposite direction. In April, he weighed 335 pounds and had borderline hypertension and prediabetes. In other words, he looked like a typical retired professional football player.

Studies have shown that NFL alumni have a much higher risk of obesity than the rest of the population. They start out bigger. And although they may enjoy exercising, lingering injuries and the shift to a sedentary daily life often prove to be a dangerous combination.

Just ask Archie Roberts, a former NFL quarterback and heart surgeon. When youre young and forceful and vital, its hard to believe that could ever change, he says. But, he put on weight over the years, and his blood pressure and cholesterol went up. Im supposed to know what that all means, notes Roberts, now 71, who ignored the mounting warning signs until the day he had a stroke.

Excerpted from the Washington Post, October 21, 2014

 

 

 

NFL Legends Eric Dickerson, Marcus Allen, Roy Green And More Attend Health Screening With Pro Player Health Alliance At Mayo Clinic

Living Heart Foundation continued their HOPE Program Screenings at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, AZ on February 22, 2014 with over 53 NFL greats and added star power of Eric Dickerson, Marcus Allen and Roy Green.
Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) February 24, 2014

The Living Heart Foundation continued their HOPE Program Screenings at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, AZ on February 22, 2014 with the added star power of Eric Dickerson, Marcus Allen and Roy Green. The event, sponsored by Pro Player Health Alliance and the NFLPA, was considered a huge success gathering over 53 NFL greats as well as ABC15, FOX10 and AZFamily news to cover the screening locally.

Excerpted from PRWEB, February 2014

 

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